Crassula mesembrianthemopsis


Scientific Name

Crassula mesembrianthemopsis Dinter

Synonyms

Crassula mesembryanthemopsis

Scientific Classification

Family: Crassulaceae
Subfamily: Crassuloideae
Genus: Crassula

Description

Crassula mesembrianthemopsis is a succulent plant with a thick underground stem and one or few dense rosettes. Leaves are green to brown or grey-green, almost club-shaped with a flat tip, up to 0.8 inches (2 cm) long, and up to 0.2 inches (0.5 cm) wide. Flowers are small, white to cream with yellow anthers.

Hardiness

USDA hardiness zones 9a to 10b: from 20 °F (−6.7 °C) to 40 °F (+4.4 °C).

How to Grow and Care

Crassulas are easy to grow, but they are susceptible to mealy bugs and fungal diseases. As with all succulents, overwatering is sure to be fatal, so err on the side of too dry rather than too wet. Never let your plant sit in water. If you water from beneath by letting the plant sit in a saucer of water, make sure to pour off any excess water after a few minutes.

These succulents are generally started by division, offsets, or leaf cuttings. Crassulas can be easily propagated from a single leaf. Sprout leaves by placing them into a potting mix for succulents, then covering the dish until they sprout.

Repot as needed, preferably during the warm season. To repot your Crassula, make sure the soil is dry before repotting, then gently remove the pot. Knock away the old soil from the roots, making sure to remove any rotted or dead roots in the process. Treat any cuts with a fungicide. Place the plant in its new pot and backfill with potting soil, spreading the roots out as you repot. Leave the plant dry for a week or so, then begin to water lightly to reduce the risk of root rot. See more at How to Grow and Care for Crassula.

Origin

Crassula mesembrianthemopsis is native to South Africa (Namaqualand) and Namibia.

Hybrids

  • Crassula 'Celia'
  • Crassula 'Morgan's Beauty'

Links

  • Back to genus Crassula
  • Succulentopedia: Browse succulents by Scientific Name, Common Name, Genus, Family, USDA Hardiness Zone, Origin, or cacti by Genus

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Crassula mesembrianthemopsis – Succulent plants

Crassula mesembrianthemopsis is a dwarf, rosulate, perennials succulent with very low-growing rosettes, even sometimes growing partial in the soil. The leaves are almost club-shaped, blue-green, with a flat tip, up to 2 cm long and up to 0.5 cm wide. It produces stemless heads of scented white flowers all over the plant and the flowers are small, white. It blooms during autumn or winter months.

Scientific Classification:

Family: Crassulaceae
Subfamily: Crassuloideae
Genus: Crassula

Scientific Name: Crassula mesembrianthemopsis Dinter
Synonyms: Crassula mesembryanthemopsis

How to grow and maintain Crassula mesembrianthemopsis:

Light:
It thrives best in bright light with some direct sunlight. A sunny windowsill will be an ideal position for these plants. They will not flower without sunlight and inadequate light will cause developing spindly growth.

Soil:
It grows well in well-drained soil with a neutral pH. Add coconut coir and Pine bark to make the soil more drainage friendly.

Water:
Water regularly, during the growing season (April to September), but water sparingly when dormant (autumn and winter). Allow the top of the soil to slightly dry out before watering again.

Temperature:
It prefers ideal room temperatures of around 60°F – 75°F / 15.5°C – 24°C. During winter no less than 50°F / 10°C. Cold weather and damp weather is not good. It loses its color and turns yellow and mushy.

Fertilizer:
Fertilize every two weeks during the growing season, from spring through summer with a balanced liquid fertilizer diluted by half. Do not fertilize during the winter.

Re-potting:
Re-pot in spring when the plant becomes root bound or the soil needs renewing. A good solid and heavy pot is best to use because of these plants are well known for being top-heavy. A heavy pot will prevent them from tipping over.

Propagation:
It can be easily propagated by stem cuttings, leaf cuttings or by basal offsets. The cuttings or offsets should be taken in spring. Take 2-3 inch long stem cuttings and plant it in a 2-3 inch pot of equal parts mixture of peat moss and sand and keep it at normal room temperature in the bright filtered light.

Pests and Diseases:
It has is no serious pest or disease problems. But they are susceptible to mealy bugs, aphids, and fungal diseases. Overwatering may cause the roots to rot.


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